Monday, July 10, 2017

Timing a Vintage Watch

I have serviced thousands of vintage Omega watches, each one gets timed out on my timing machine. Every now and then I’ll hear back from a customer about his watch being a little slow or a little fast. Here is some information about why your watch may run a little fast or a little slow even though it’s been timed on the machine. This information came directly from the source with a new Omega in the 1950’s and 60’s. It was true then and even more so now that your activity level makes a difference. If your watch happens to be a little fast or slow according to your life style, I will be happy to make an adjustment.

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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Refurbished vs. Restored

I have been seeing the word "refurbished" in reference to watches lately. As a watchmaker this makes me cringe. I would like to set the record straight. Refurbished is a toaster !!!

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A watch, art or a vintage car is "restored"! You will never see a '67 Corvette up for auction referred to as "refurbished." You can go on Amazon and buy refurbished toasters all day long.

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Tuesday, June 20, 2017

The Dangers of Cheap Tools Damaging Case Backs

Watch case backs take a beating!!! 20 years of practice, specialty tools and a sharp eye, I can undo some damage but not all. Damaged case backs like this can be easily prevented with better quality tools.

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A two pronged tool is by far the most dangerous! A tool like this is the number one cause of damage to case backs from slipping.

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This tool is the next step up. Much safer but still risky. This tool can be used safely with a steady hand and some skill.

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This is a Bergeon Watch Case Opener; what a watchmaker would use. I would recommend having a watchmaker open your watch to prevent damage. Inconvenient? Not nearly as inconvenient as sending me your case back to be repaired!

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More About the Importance of a Functioning Crown

I have written before about the importance of a functioning crown over having an original one. I get asked all the time "Can I keep the original crown on the watch?" Sure, if you want the watch to look like one of these.

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These are several examples where owners wanted to keep the "original" Omega crown. I deal with this more than I would like to. An "original crown" has ZERO value to a watch if the gasket inside is no good. How well would you expect a rubber gasket to hold up after 50 or 60 years? I would rather have an aftermarket or another brand crown than a bad original. Every watch I buy gets a new crown if it needs it. If the original brand is not available, use any other brand till you can find one.


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